The Lone Chick seems to be pulling through.

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Diane Porter
Posts: 213
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 7:30 am
Location: Iowa

brent wrote: Wed Jun 24, 2020 7:08 pm
I think that little chick will survive. Keep us posted.

I took some solace from Brent's words, when the one and only nestling in our colony got off to a rough start. His/her three siblings disappeared from the nest within two days of hatching. Then the poor survivor began to look very ratty and miserable as something pecked him or ate his feathers. I thought for a while he was not going to make it.

I took advice of experienced landlords on this forum, did three nest changes, applied Sevin under the nesting material, and worried every single day.

But today he/she is 20 days old, and what I saw in the gourd this afternoon was a bright-eyed little chick whose wounds were healed and who had pretty good looking feathers. I have great hopes that this baby is going to fledge successfully in a few days.
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Last edited by Diane Porter on Thu Jul 16, 2020 7:40 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Diane Porter
Fairfield, Iowa
brent
Posts: 175
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:43 pm
Location: Raceland, Louisiana

Hi Diane! I am so excited and happy. This is the nicest heart warming story. What a healthy looking little chick. And a lucky one to have a caring landlord like you. Keep us posted!

Brent
dsonyay
Posts: 1196
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:10 pm
Location: Louisiana/Broussard
Martin Colony History: 2010-2014 located in Slidell LA. Gourd rack with 16 gourds. Max of 2 pairs during this short period in Slidell. Plenty of fledglings.

2014-present.. moved to Broussard LA. Same Gourd Rack but added a 6 room house (modified from a 12 room)

2020: after a long drought of nothing, 4 pairs and 4 nests, 23 eggs total (May2020)

Yeah, he looks very healthy and ready to take on the world. Good job!

David
dsonyay
Posts: 1196
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:10 pm
Location: Louisiana/Broussard
Martin Colony History: 2010-2014 located in Slidell LA. Gourd rack with 16 gourds. Max of 2 pairs during this short period in Slidell. Plenty of fledglings.

2014-present.. moved to Broussard LA. Same Gourd Rack but added a 6 room house (modified from a 12 room)

2020: after a long drought of nothing, 4 pairs and 4 nests, 23 eggs total (May2020)

How's the lone chick?
Diane Porter
Posts: 213
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 7:30 am
Location: Iowa

dsonyay wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:23 pm
How's the lone chick?
Well, dsonyay, I am happy to say the Lone Chick is looking pretty good. Yesterday he/she started perching out on the porch. I thought maybe it had fledged today, because this afternoon there were no PMs anywhere to be seen, but half an hour ago I saw Queen Victoria (the mother) looking into Gourd 7, again, so maybe the chick is still in there tonight. Today is Day 27, so it looks like fledging will be any time now.

Thank you for your interest!
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Diane Porter
Fairfield, Iowa
Ed Svetich-WI
Posts: 797
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 10:05 pm
Location: Brooks, Wi (McGinnis Lake)
Martin Colony History: 24 Super and Excluder Gourds on two gourd racks, all SREH. Full occupancy. My philosophy is to maximize fledge % with existing cavities rather than adding gourds to grow colony, thus providing opportunities for new colony expansion. Fledge over 100 nestlings yearly from 24 gourds. Band nestlings in cooperation with state university. 2019 Adendum: Reduced colony size to 12 gourds to focus on more intensive management regimen.

This one could not have made it without you. Quality is better than quantity. One martin at a time. Fortunately, it is usually not this involved.

Good job.

Ed
Whippy
Posts: 596
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2017 11:15 pm
Location: Plano, Texas
Martin Colony History: 2016 - late to put up, many visitors
2017 - 1 pair, 3 fledged
2018- 2 pair, 12 fledged
2019 - 4 pair, 21 fledged
2020 - 15 pair, 67 fledged

Way to go Diane.

Frame that picture and hang it in your kitchen. What a great, proud, story you can tell when someone looks at that picture with a perplexing glaze on their face.

Coolwhips
Sue P
Posts: 395
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 12:10 pm
Location: Morgantown, WV

I tagged on to this post because I am not sure what to do. I have a lone chick too, and had 2 chicks yesterday. He is about the age of the one pictured above, but as far as I can see no one is paying any attention to him. I will change his nest as suggested, but I am worried about the fact that he isn't getting anything to eat --- at least it sure looks like it. He could be abandoned. I thought of putting him in another nest that has 2 chicks that are older than he is, or putting him in another nest that has 6 chicks about his age. Can any experts tell me what to do? I don't want to see him die.
Ed Svetich-WI
Posts: 797
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 10:05 pm
Location: Brooks, Wi (McGinnis Lake)
Martin Colony History: 24 Super and Excluder Gourds on two gourd racks, all SREH. Full occupancy. My philosophy is to maximize fledge % with existing cavities rather than adding gourds to grow colony, thus providing opportunities for new colony expansion. Fledge over 100 nestlings yearly from 24 gourds. Band nestlings in cooperation with state university. 2019 Adendum: Reduced colony size to 12 gourds to focus on more intensive management regimen.

I suggest watching the nest he is in closely, if you can. If you observe adults bringing insects within a half hour or so, I would not necessarily worry. One chick does not require as many visits as a nest full. Are you saying there were two chicks in the nest yesterday? That would be a concern. A nest of six is a good size clutch but I have nests of seven that do fine. Moving the nestling is a possibility.

Good luck and thanks for being an active martin landlord.

Ed
John Barrow
Posts: 941
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 4:12 pm
Location: Corpus Christi / Sandia , Texas

SueP,

It is normal for parents to reduce or essentially stop feeding nestlings as they approach and reach fledge age. This is done in an attempt to encourage them to leave the nest. If the chick you are concerned about was with a second chick it's possible the other chick has fledged and the parents are attending to it. They have not abandoned the remaining chick and are likely nearby and are aware of the remaining chick. Moving the chick as you suggest is not a good option. Moving it in with two larger nestlings will place it 3rd in line, essentially duplicating the situation you're already in and further delay its leaving and regular feeding. Placing it in to a group of six will strain the feeding demand of a fully loaded family group that will likely fledge over several days.
~~TEAMED WITH A MARTIN GODDESS~~

Member/Mentor-PMCA. I do regular nestchecks and participate in PROJECT MARTINWATCH!! Coordinated 3 geolocator studies-2009, 2010 & 2013. State and Fed licensed bander (retired Jan., 2020)
Diane Porter
Posts: 213
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 7:30 am
Location: Iowa

Sue P wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 10:22 am
I tagged on to this post because I am not sure what to do. I have a lone chick too, and had 2 chicks yesterday. He is about the age of the one pictured above, but as far as I can see no one is paying any attention to him. I will change his nest as suggested, but I am worried about the fact that he isn't getting anything to eat --- at least it sure looks like it. He could be abandoned. I thought of putting him in another nest that has 2 chicks that are older than he is, or putting him in another nest that has 6 chicks about his age. Can any experts tell me what to do? I don't want to see him die.
There are two photos above. The one closest above your post was taken when the chick was 27 days old. She or he fledged the next day. So I think your baby bird is past the stage of being put back in a nest. It's my understanding that interference at this stage is likely to cause the chick to fly whether it's ready or not. I'd rather let it be until it goes on its own.

Also, I was worried because I saw very few feedings of that chick during its nestling stage. I think it was because there was only one, and as others pointed out, one chick does not require the parents to make as many feedings as a full nest would. Even though I was afraid it wasn't getting enough to eat, it seemed to develop just fine and fly away right on schedule.
Diane Porter
Fairfield, Iowa
dsonyay
Posts: 1196
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:10 pm
Location: Louisiana/Broussard
Martin Colony History: 2010-2014 located in Slidell LA. Gourd rack with 16 gourds. Max of 2 pairs during this short period in Slidell. Plenty of fledglings.

2014-present.. moved to Broussard LA. Same Gourd Rack but added a 6 room house (modified from a 12 room)

2020: after a long drought of nothing, 4 pairs and 4 nests, 23 eggs total (May2020)

I'm really happy to hear he did ok. You did a superb job. That's such a good pic too. That little guy had terrible odds against him but you certainly fudged the odds back towards him. Really puts a smile on my face. He's got a lot more dangers left but he sure got off to a healthy start. Great going. I'm gonna remember this next year when the going gets tough.
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