Brad's Sparrow Trap - DIY build

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Brad-AL
Posts: 566
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 2:00 pm
Location: North AL

Brad's Sparrow Trap - DIY build

Postby Brad-AL » Sat Jun 26, 2010 8:16 am

Brad’s Sparrow Trap – DIY build

I sold this trap for several years, they are scattered throughout the US. This trap is very effective, and if used properly can reduce a large House Sparrow population quickly. When I first started using these traps, I caught over 300 HOSP the first year that I used them. To ensure success you must place the trap where the birds are. HOSP naturally eat seeds off the ground. I have my most success when placing this trap directly on the ground, either on bare dirt, concrete, or on a piece of plywood.

While building this trap, make certain that you wear eye protection. The small left over ends of wire that you will be cutting off, can fly many feet when cut. Protect you vision. You may also want to wear gloves while building this trap. When any wire is cut it leaves a sharp edge. Gloves and even a long sleeved shirt can protect you from scratches.

To build this trap, you will need a 60 inch length of 3 foot wide, ½ inch by 1 inch welded cage wire. It’s also sometimes called rabbit wire. You will also need at least 100 J-clips with J clip pliers, or 4 inch zip ties, and a good pair of side cutting pliers to construct the trap. It’s pretty simple you don’t even need a tape measure.

First lay the wire out flat. You can see that I marked the first cuts with painters tape. I did this to make them easier to see in the pictures, it’s not necessary to mark them. The first two pieces we’ll cut are the top and the bottom of the trap. Those two pieces need to be 21 inches long and 17 inches wide, refer to the pictures before cutting. I never use a tape measure when building a trap from this wire. Simply count the wires to come up with the length and width. Just remember when counting one direction, your wires are ½ inch apart, and when counting the other the wires are 1 inch apart. By making the trap 17 inches wide, there is very little waste. (pic 1297 and 1299)

Now that you have the top and bottom of the trap, now cut out the two ends. They should be 7 inches tall and 17 inches wide. (pic 1301) You will now have a full width piece of your original cage wire, around 18 inches long left.

I have never caught a Starling in a bait trap of any kind. If you wish to make this a Starling and Sparrow trap, you need to make the trap funnel 6 inches wide by 7 inches long. For HOSP only, make the funnel pieces 5 inches wide by 7 inches long. It is very important to but the funnel pieces exactly as shown in the photo. A sparrow funnel is on the left, a HOSP and Starling funnel is on the right. (pic 1308) Once you have the funnels cut out bend them into a curved shape and bend the “stickers” down towards the center of the funnel. (insert pic 1311) Now use a scrap piece of wire to cut out the “corral” that goes at the end of each funnel. Each corral should be 7 inches long and one inch tall. (pic 1319)

Attach the funnel and corral to the bottom panel of the trap as shown. Count the distance on each side of the funnel to make sure the funnel is centered on the bottom panel. The funnels and corral should be attached to the ends of the bottom panel. (The 17 inch wide end) (pic 1320) Now start attaching the end panels. Once the end panels are attached, mark and cutout the entrance hole to the funnels. Once the entrance hole is marked, you can lift the side panel to make cutting the entrance hole easier. The entrance hole can be cut in between wire sections. (pics 1325 and 1326) Now attach the side panels of the trap in the same method you used to attach the end panels. Attach the side panels to the end panels, as well as to the bottom panel of the trap. When I was selling traps, I did not have a holding cage for a “bait” bird in the traps. I never left a bird in the trap to help lure others in. I never had a problem catching birds without a “bait” bird. I have added a “bait” bird holding cage to this trap in the event that you want to add one to yours. You can either add this, or leave this step out. If you wish to add the small cage, you will need a section of wire 14 inches long and 6 ½ inches tall. Bend the 14 inch long section so that each end is 4 inches long, leaving the longest side 6 inches long. If you cut the panel 7 inches tall, the same as the end panels, it will be too tall for the top panel to sit flat. Attach the holding cage to one side panel of the trap as shown. (pic 1329)

We’re almost done. All that’s left to do now is attach the top panel, cut out and install the doors. Install the top panel so that the 1 inch wire runs on the top side of the length of the trap. This makes it easier to debur the door opening. (pic 1334)

Once the top panel is attached to the 4 sides and to the holding cage, you can cut out the doors. You can make the door any size you wish as long as you have enough wire to cover the holes. The main door needs to be 2 inches wider, and 2 inches longer than the opening. The holding cage door needs to be 2 inches wider and 1 inch longer than the opening in the holding cage. (pic 1347) I cut the main opening 5 inches by 5 inches, leaving 2 inches of top panel between that opening and the opening for the holding cage. The holding cage opening is 4 inches by 4 inches. Cut out the doors for each opening. (pic 1332)

*The edges of the wire on the openings you cut in the top panel must be filed smooth with a file or a grinding wheel, OR you can leave the cut pieces of wire long, and roll them with pliers.* If you fail to do this, you will find that your arms will look like you’ve been chasing a rabbit around in a briar patch when you remove birds from the trap. Roll the wires over or under the cross wire, depending on which side of the opening you are working on. You can see two different sides of an opening in photo 1345. One side the wires are bent up and over. The other side they are bent down and under. (pic 1337 and 1345) Attach the doors onto the top of the trap as shown (pic 1349)

Once the doors are attached, you have a completed HOSP bait trap. I use white millet seed for bait. I place a small pile (maybe 1/8th cup) close to a long side of the trap. I then sprinkle a very small amount of seed around the trap, and just a few inside the funnel. This trap relies on a birds desire to fly as their escape mechanism to work. You will see the trapped birds trying to fly up and out the trap. Very few times a bird will figure out that it can go back out the funnel. Not to worry, they’ll come back. I have marked HOSP with a small amount of paint, let them go, and caught them in the trap the next day. If you don’t put much bait in the funnel, the birds are less likely to escape.

If you cannot find the exact wire that I use to build these traps, you could make the trap from ½ inch hardware cloth. HOSP can escape from 1 inch square cage wire, so do not use it. In my opinion the funnel must be made from the wire I use. You can try a different wire and it might work. It is not my intention to sell anything. My time is very limited. If you absolutely can not find the proper wire, I will send you the funnels for $5 plus shipping. They will be shipped flat. If you need the funnels, you can contact me at yard1man@charter.net Use the subject line: funnels

Remember, you must think like a HOSP to catch a HOSP. Find the shrub or tree that they congregate in and trap there. Take the trap to them, don’t make them find it.

The pictures posted here are not for the use of any individual or company to commercially reproduce this trap in any form. They are strictly posted so landlords can build a trap for their use. These photos or directions to build a trap should not be posted on another site without my approval. Thanks.

Good luck and good trapping,
Brad Biddle
Attachments
Picture 1337 - PMCA.jpg
You can see two different sides of an opening in photo 1345. One side the wires are bent up and over. The other side they are bent down and under.
Picture 1337 - PMCA.jpg (57.72 KiB) Viewed 30526 times
Picture 1345 - PMCA.jpg
You can see two different sides of an opening in photo 1345. One side the wires are bent up and over. The other side they are bent down and under.
Picture 1345 - PMCA.jpg (58.56 KiB) Viewed 31757 times
Picture 1349 - PMCA.jpg
Attach the doors onto the top of the trap as shown. The red circles indicate where the zip ties, or j clips should be placed. These will act as the hinges. With the addition of two "snaps" to hold the doors closed, you are ready to catch House Sparrows
Picture 1349 - PMCA.jpg (28.54 KiB) Viewed 55532 times
Picture 1320 - PMCA.jpg
Attach the funnel and corral to the bottom panel of the trap as shown. Count the distance on each side of the funnel to make sure the funnel is centered on the bottom panel. The funnels and corral should be attached to the ends of the bottom panel. (Th
Picture 1320 - PMCA.jpg (54.7 KiB) Viewed 29688 times
Picture 1325 - PMCA.jpg
Now start attaching the end panels. Once the end panels are attached, mark and cutout the entrance hole to the funnels. Once the entrance hole is marked, you can lift the side panel to make cutting the entrance hole easier. The entrance hole can be cut
Picture 1325 - PMCA.jpg (55.16 KiB) Viewed 29440 times
Picture 1326 - PMCA.jpg
Now start attaching the end panels. Once the end panels are attached, mark and cutout the entrance hole to the funnels. Once the entrance hole is marked, you can lift the side panel to make cutting the entrance hole easier. The entrance hole can be cut
Picture 1326 - PMCA.jpg (33.2 KiB) Viewed 29211 times
Picture 1329 - PMCA.jpg
You can either add this, or leave this step out. If you wish to add the small cage, you will need a section of wire 14 inches long and 6 ½ inches tall. Bend the 14 inch long section so that each end is 4 inches long, leaving the longest side 6 inches lo
Picture 1329 - PMCA.jpg (57.92 KiB) Viewed 29686 times
Picture 1334 - PMCA.jpg
Install the top panel so that the 1 inch wire runs on the top side of the length of the trap. This makes it easier to debur the door opening.
Picture 1334 - PMCA.jpg (57.93 KiB) Viewed 29194 times
Picture 1347 - PMCA.jpg
Once the top panel is attached to the 4 sides and to the holding cage, you can cut out the doors.
Picture 1347 - PMCA.jpg (37.3 KiB) Viewed 29748 times
Picture 1332 - PMCA.jpg
I cut the main opening 5 inches by 5 inches, leaving 2 inches of top panel between that opening and the opening for the holding cage. The holding cage opening is 4 inches by 4 inches. Cut out the doors for each opening.
Picture 1332 - PMCA.jpg (45.43 KiB) Viewed 30022 times
Picture 1297 - PMCA.jpg
First lay the wire out flat. You can see that I marked the first cuts with painters tape. I did this to make them easier to see in the pictures, it’s not necessary to mark them. The first two pieces we’ll cut are the top and the bottom of the trap. Th
Picture 1297 - PMCA.jpg (55.51 KiB) Viewed 30310 times
Picture 1299 - PMCA.jpg
First lay the wire out flat. You can see that I marked the first cuts with painters tape. I did this to make them easier to see in the pictures, it’s not necessary to mark them. The first two pieces we’ll cut are the top and the bottom of the trap. Th
Picture 1299 - PMCA.jpg (55.53 KiB) Viewed 29662 times
Picture 1301 - PMCA.jpg
Now that you have the top and bottom of the trap, now cut out the two ends. They should be 7 inches tall and 17 inches wide.
Picture 1301 - PMCA.jpg (54.48 KiB) Viewed 29156 times
Picture 1308 - PMCA.jpg
I have never caught a Starling in a bait trap of any kind. If you wish to make this a Starling and Sparrow trap, you need to make the trap funnel 6 inches wide by 7 inches long. For HOSP only, make the funnel pieces 5 inches wide by 7 inches long. It i
Picture 1308 - PMCA.jpg (48.95 KiB) Viewed 29884 times
Picture 1311 - PMCA.jpg
Once you have the funnels cut out bend them into a curved shape and bend the “stickers” down at an angle, towards the center of the funnel. By doing so, you are reducing the size of the opening to around 1 1/2 inches, and the angle of the wire helps prev
Picture 1311 - PMCA.jpg (31.89 KiB) Viewed 29491 times
Picture 1319 - PMCA.jpg
Now use a scrap piece of wire to cut out the “corral” that goes at the end of each funnel. Each corral should be 7 inches long and one inch tall.
Picture 1319 - PMCA.jpg (43.03 KiB) Viewed 29451 times

Brad-AL
Posts: 566
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 2:00 pm
Location: North AL

Postby Brad-AL » Sat Jun 26, 2010 9:11 am

The pics are posted backwards. The last one at the top, the first one at the bottom. Sorry for that. Does anyone know how I got the one pic to show up when the post is opened and the others have to be opened by the viewer of the post? It was an accident, but I'd like to fix them all that way. :oops:

Emil Pampell-Tx
Posts: 6728
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 1:26 pm
Location: Tx, Richmond (SW of Houston)
Martin Colony History: First started in Gretna, La in 1969 with a small homemade house, have had martins ever since at 2 different homes in Texas

Postby Emil Pampell-Tx » Sat Jun 26, 2010 11:33 am

Brad, did you reduce the size of that one photo? I think that they show up if they are smaller, the larger ones must be opened.
PMCA Member, 250 gourds, 6 poles, 2traps

Brad-AL
Posts: 566
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 2:00 pm
Location: North AL

Postby Brad-AL » Sat Jun 26, 2010 11:53 am

I reduced the size of all of them to the same standard size

John Carter
Posts: 132
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 1:15 am
Location: Burlington/Iowa

Sparrow Trap

Postby John Carter » Sat Jun 26, 2010 2:57 pm

Brad
Looks like a keeper....would like to see a photo of the finished trap. I make a repeating trap but this looks like it would be easier to make and more compact.
john in SE IA

Brad-AL
Posts: 566
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 2:00 pm
Location: North AL

Postby Brad-AL » Sat Jun 26, 2010 4:08 pm

John, I can post a completed trap photo tonight. These traps are easy to make, take advantage of sparrows primarily being ground feeders, and are almost indestructible. If you decide to build one, you won't regret it.

LarryMelcher/KY
Posts: 675
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:08 pm
Location: Kentucky/Shepherdsville

Postby LarryMelcher/KY » Sun Feb 26, 2012 8:37 pm

Here is a video that I made of Brad's Trap. I made this one from his instructions. A Fine Trap Indeed!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xb7s13Xfpmg
I manage 2 public sites, and one at home, for a total of 172 cavities. Board Member / Non Profit PMCA.
Find videos that I edit for the PMCA Youtube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/PurpleMartinPMCA

Brad-AL
Posts: 566
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 2:00 pm
Location: North AL

Postby Brad-AL » Tue Mar 12, 2013 9:07 pm

Larry, I didn't know you posted a video of the trap on youtube. That's cool. Thanks.
High quality plastic gourds with porched, tunnelled SREH are Martin magnets.

Tony Lau
Posts: 73
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2003 9:53 pm
Location: Minnesota/Otsego

Postby Tony Lau » Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:01 pm

If you leave a sparrow in the trap to lure others, it's a good idea to trim it's primary feathers off one wing so if it escapes it can't fly properly.

Guest

Postby Guest » Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:09 pm

Super cool video! Thanks for sharing.


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