Pellet guns...What do you own or recommend?

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T-Bird
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 1:08 am
Location: McKinney Texas
Martin Colony History: Rookie Season
Trendsetter 12
PMCA Member

Looking to buy a pellet gun to help with pests around the property. I’ve had Daisy and Crossman in my younger days, but I know there are several different options out there now. What do you guys like to shoot?
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

Beeman R9 breakbarrel spring-piston .20 rifle with Bushnell scope. No matter how hard I try to master the artillery hold, I am not pleased with my accuracy. Not blaming the rifle because someone proficient in the artillery hold could make me look like a new recruit.
Benjamin Marauder pre-charged pneumatic (PCP) synthetic stock with .177 Lothar Walther Match Barrel with Picatinny rail from Pyramyd Air and an appropriate scope is the cat's meow to me. Second choice would be a Benjamin Discovery PCP.
I have great respect for either the Benjamin Marauder PCP or Benjamin Discovery PCP. i have shot a Benjamin Discovery with iron sights and I am confident that a HOSP or EUS would not fair well. With an appropriate scope, I might feel like Davy Crockett (although his accuracy was without a scope).

Is it true that a Mexican officer documented in his diary that Mexican Artillery crews had to pull back out of range from marksmen shooting from the Alamo because Artillery crew members were being selectively picked off? My Dad always believed that was Tennesseans with their long rifles.
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Wed Jan 22, 2020 9:26 pm, edited 4 times in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
i_carumba
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Apr 09, 2019 8:27 pm
Location: Southern Saskatchewan, Canada

I use a cheap pump up Crosman rifle with a 3-9 x 40 scope on it.
The most important thing I can recommend is pacing off the distance you plan to be shooting from and then set up a practice target and practice getting your scope set up and then shooting until you can hit a golf ball sized target with accuracy.
Also if you are shooting where there are neighbors make sure if (when) you miss your pellet cannot keep going and possibly hit someone or something.
Bird Brain
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2016 9:22 am
Location: Highland Village, TX
Martin Colony History: 2017-nothing
2018-1 visitor
2019-nothing
2020-the most visitors/activity by far after making many site improvements. Unsuccessful SY Male visited for 2 weeks.

I've learned one thing for sure. House Sparrows are what I shoot the most. The SREH entrances take care of starlings. HOSP need to be shot. .177 caliber is more accurate than .22 for shooting such a small target like a HOSP. I like the Benjamin 397 for HOSP. With only 2 pumps and no scope, I can hit a tiny HOSP from 35 feet with a .177 wadcutter pellet. 2 pump shots reduce the risk of damaging gourds or housing in case I miss. If you buy a cannon to shoot HOSP, there is greater likelihood of damaging expensive martin gourds or housing. I had a Benjamin 392, and I missed half of the time. I sold it on Craigslist and bought a .177 version. Bought mine at Cabela's for about $120. I rarely miss with the .177 caliber. The most important thing with HOSP is your cloak. They are almost impossible to shoot if they see you. I lean the barrel over my fence and they never see me. I also have a Diana 460 Magnum .22 caliber. I occasionally use it for a long shot at a starling. It works well for these occasional shots. But 90% of the time, it's me and the Benjamin 397 taking out a HOSP.
Every time I kill a house sparrow, I make the world a better place.
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

Bird Brain,
The Benjamin 397 reminds me of a modern, upgraded version of a Benjamin 317.
My Father had a 317 which was my scoped sparrow sniper rifle as a young teenager. It took 5 pumps for an accurate shot at 25-30 feet. I had a great hide to shoot from and was very successful with that 317.
My brother in law still uses that scoped 317 for my sister's colony in Seguin, TX. He rests the rifle on a large plastic trash can and shoots around the corner of the building.
Your Benjamin 397 might be the perfect recommendation for T-Bird since it is more affordable.
Baker Airguns sells a one piece scope mount for the 392/397 which securely attaches to the breech block and does not put pressure on the soldered joint between the brass barrel and the brass air tube or the brass breech and the brass air tube.
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Sat Jan 18, 2020 12:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
tlragsdale
Posts: 218
Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2013 12:22 pm
Location: Wisconsin/New Richmond

Lots of opinions as to which is the best….I posted nearly this exact post several years ago, and also received a myriad of opinions. I ended-up with an RWS Diana model, which I love. Regardless of what brand/model you purchase, do yourself a favor and buy a variety of pellets----you'll very likely find your gun-of-choice "likes" a particular pellet better than others. I went through several types, and was amazed at the difference in the way my gun grouped when I tried different projectiles.

Best of luck in putting a big dent in the population of your problem birds.
Terry & Michelle
New Richmond, WI

2005 - 2014 Hard luck stories
2015 - 2 pair, 12 eggs/12 fledglings
2016 - 6 pair, 35 eggs/35 fledged
2017 - 18 pair, 88 eggs / 85 fledged.
2018 - 23 pair, 119 eggs/115 fledged.
2019 - 31 pair, 137 eggs/133 fledged
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

Terry,
I am providing the link to the PMCA topic, TIPS ON USING A PELLET RIFLE TO CONTROL NON NATIVE BIRDS, you referred to:
https://www.purplemartin.org/forum/view ... =2&t=31825
I am going to use your suggestion to try RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle .177 Cal., 8.2 Grains, Wadcutter Professional Line Pellets on my RWS Diana 350 Magnum .177 air rifle. I use the artillery hold and marksmanship techniques (sight picture, breath control, trigger squeeze, etc.) and need to see if your suggestion of different pellets will help my poor groupings with this rifle.

T-Bird,
I failed to mention - Rifle is a better term.
"This is my rifle, this is my gun; This one's for shooting and this one's for fun." Holding your M1, M14, or M16 rifle above your head, running around in a circle, while the DI and everyone else is watching. No one will ever make that mistake again.
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Tue Jan 21, 2020 6:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
flyin-lowe
Posts: 2935
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 8:49 am
Location: Indiana/Henry Co.

I have tried several air rifles over the years, none of them where what I would consider to be the "profesional grade". The ones I have bought have been from retail stores and around the 150.00 range. None of them have been accurate enough to hit a sparrow constantly. They are small targets and you typically can't get super close to them after you shoot a few time. If you want to go with an air rifle it would be better to spend the money to get a high quality one in the beginning instead of ending up with a 150.00 one that you can't really use for sparrows. Also shooting an air rifle consistently is a little different then shooting other guns, it takes some practice
2020 Currently 42 nest, 110 babies, 64 eggs left to hatch(6-22-20) HOSP count-8
2019- 31 Pair over 100 fledged
2018- 15 pair last count 49 fledged
2017 3 SY pair nested, 12 eggs total, fledged 10. 4 additional SY's stayed all summer but never paired/nested.
2016 1 pair fledged 4
2015 Visitors
2014 Visitors
2013 Moved 6 miles away, 1 pair fledged 2.
2012 30 pair fledged 100.
2011 12 pair (11 that nested), 43 fledged.
2010 5 pair, 21 eggs, 16 hatched, 14 fledged.
T-Bird
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 1:08 am
Location: McKinney Texas
Martin Colony History: Rookie Season
Trendsetter 12
PMCA Member

flyin-lowe wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:24 am
I have tried several air rifles over the years, none of them where what I would consider to be the "profesional grade". The ones I have bought have been from retail stores and around the 150.00 range. None of them have been accurate enough to hit a sparrow constantly. They are small targets and you typically can't get super close to them after you shoot a few time. If you want to go with an air rifle it would be better to spend the money to get a high quality one in the beginning instead of ending up with a 150.00 one that you can't really use for sparrows. Also shooting an air rifle consistently is a little different then shooting other guns, it takes some practice
What would you consider a “high quality” rifle ?
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

$150 air rifle will have a hard time with accuracy.
A Benjamin 397S .177 variable pump air rifle from PyramydAir will currently be $199 for the rifle with iron sights and $269 for the rifle with mounted scope. A sparrow won't be very lucky at 30 yds. with that rifle and pellets that group well with the rifle.
A Benjamin Maurader Syrod Combo with .177 Lothar Walther barrel (rifle with mounted scope) is $699 from PyramydAir. A sparrow at 30-50 yds. does not stand a chance.
After that prices can easily exceed $1000, but then you need to assess your marksmanship and sniper skills to match the rifle. Beyond 50 yds,, windage, elevation, inclination, etc. come into play.

I missed a shot yesterday because I did not add an extra mil dot below the target for a 60 degrees elevation shot.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
T-Bird
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 1:08 am
Location: McKinney Texas
Martin Colony History: Rookie Season
Trendsetter 12
PMCA Member

4th Gen Martin Fan wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:01 pm
$150 air rifle will have a hard time with accuracy.
A Benjamin 397S .177 variable pump air rifle from PyramydAir will currently be $199 for the rifle with iron sights and $269 for the rifle with mounted scope. A sparrow won't be very lucky at 30 yds. with that rifle and pellets that group well with the rifle.
A Benjamin Maurader Syrod Combo with .177 Lothar Walther barrel (rifle with mounted scope) is $699 from PyramydAir. A sparrow at 30-50 yds. does not stand a chance.
After that prices can easily exceed $1000, but then you need to assess your marksmanship and sniper skills to match the rifle. Beyond 50 yds,, windage, elevation, inclination, etc. come into play.

I missed a shot yesterday because I did not add an extra mil dot below the target for a 60 degrees elevation shot.
Why .177 and not .22 ?
Last edited by T-Bird on Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

Short answer centers around the equation - E = m x c squared. (Sorry I do not have time this morning to learn how to denote power of two on a computer).

Long answers involve what kind of prey do you expect to hit (HOSP vs. EUS), how much damage do you want to incur to your Trendsetter 12 if you miss and hit the house, how much noise to you want to make (especially if you go supersonic with pellet speed), how far out do you expect to shoot, do you already have access to a .22 air rifle, ..........
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Sat Feb 15, 2020 9:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
T-Bird
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 1:08 am
Location: McKinney Texas
Martin Colony History: Rookie Season
Trendsetter 12
PMCA Member

Seriously thinking about shooting CB shorts through my .22 lr. Do any of you have experience with that? :idea:
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

45 years experience with .22 Long Rifle. No experience with .22 CB and only minimal experience with .22 Short.
Of course, the .22 Short can be shot in a rifle chambered for .22 LR but accuracy will be reduced. I have never had a specific rifle chambered for .22 Short.
I forgot about .22 CB Short. You can give them a shot through your .22 LR rifle. Try not to hit your nice Trendsetter 12 house. Be aware of the back drop and unhappy neighbors.
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:38 pm, edited 4 times in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
Bird Brain
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2016 9:22 am
Location: Highland Village, TX
Martin Colony History: 2017-nothing
2018-1 visitor
2019-nothing
2020-the most visitors/activity by far after making many site improvements. Unsuccessful SY Male visited for 2 weeks.

Why .177 instead of .22 pellet ? .22 pellet will shoot straight but requires more velocity to do so. The heavier the projectile, the more velocity needed for accuracy which increases risk of gourd or housing damage. The lighter .177 pellet requires less velocity to shoot accurately reducing risk of housing damage. The idea is to hit a very small HOSP with the lightest pellet requiring the least amount of power for accuracy so as not to damage your housing. That's why I use the Benjamin 397 and only give it 2 pumps at 35 feet. I've killed boat loads of HOSP but I haven't damaged any housing. It will kill EUST also, but may require an extra pump or two. Extra pumps required for longer shots. If you a buy a springer or a PCP, you will only have one magnum power velocity, which is overkill for plinking a HOSP off of a martin pole. I read somewhere, ".177 for feather, .22 for fur." You wouldn't shoot a squirrel with a deer rifle. You wouldn't shoot ducks with buck shot. Same holds true for pellet guns. Right gun for the right prey. I do use my magnum springer occasionally for a long shot at a EUST. I think the perfect combination is to have one .177 multi-pump for HOSP, and one magnum springer or PCP for an occasional longer shot at a EUST on a tree or telephone line. But start off with the .177 multi-pump because that's what you'll be needing the most for HOSP. Your SREH's will take care of most of the EUST.
Every time I kill a house sparrow, I make the world a better place.
flyin-lowe
Posts: 2935
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 8:49 am
Location: Indiana/Henry Co.

T-Bird wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 2:03 pm
flyin-lowe wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:24 am
I have tried several air rifles over the years, none of them where what I would consider to be the "profesional grade". The ones I have bought have been from retail stores and around the 150.00 range. None of them have been accurate enough to hit a sparrow constantly. They are small targets and you typically can't get super close to them after you shoot a few time. If you want to go with an air rifle it would be better to spend the money to get a high quality one in the beginning instead of ending up with a 150.00 one that you can't really use for sparrows. Also shooting an air rifle consistently is a little different then shooting other guns, it takes some practice
What would you consider a “high quality” rifle ?
When I was shopping them Benjamin was the name that came up the most. Like everything else you can get some air rifles that are thousands of dollars, but Benjamin had the cheapest ones that we still considered a step above the retail models.
2020 Currently 42 nest, 110 babies, 64 eggs left to hatch(6-22-20) HOSP count-8
2019- 31 Pair over 100 fledged
2018- 15 pair last count 49 fledged
2017 3 SY pair nested, 12 eggs total, fledged 10. 4 additional SY's stayed all summer but never paired/nested.
2016 1 pair fledged 4
2015 Visitors
2014 Visitors
2013 Moved 6 miles away, 1 pair fledged 2.
2012 30 pair fledged 100.
2011 12 pair (11 that nested), 43 fledged.
2010 5 pair, 21 eggs, 16 hatched, 14 fledged.
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

flyin-lowe,
I agree that many Benjamin models are appropriate for the situations we meet in a purple martin colony.
When Benjamin Air Rifle Company acquired the Sheridan Company in 1977, they changed the 342/347 to incorporate many superior design features of the Sheridan "Blue Streak"/"Silver Streak", "C" Series" 5 mm/.20 cal air rifles.
When Crosman Corporation acquired Benjamin/Sheridan in 1992, the same design features of the Sheridan "C" Series were continued in the 392/397.

Bird Brain and you influenced me to acquire a 1972 Sheridan "Blue Streak" to find out if these Sheridan models are worthy of the accolades. I will have to refurbish the rifle before I can judge it. A 48 year old air rifle is worthy of refurbishment. This 1972 rifle will need a thorough cleaning and lubrication as a minimum. It will probably need a reseal kit. I have been studying YouTube videos by NorthWestAirgun on restoring a pumper air rifle.

T-Bird,
I fear that we have lost you, the original poster, in this discussion. Please continue to ask your appropriate questions so you can get answers.
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Sat Feb 15, 2020 9:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
jogl
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 2:17 pm
Location: SW Ontario, Canada

It depends on what you are shooting. We have a selection of air rifles, gassers, levers (like the old Daiseys), and crack barrels, some good ones and some cheapy's.

From a land lord's point of view, even though it is a cheapy, I like our Beeman crack barrel with a 0.22 barrel on it the best for shooting hosps and starlings. It is one of the weakest air rifles that we have but it gets the job done. The best part about it is that if the light is right you can watch the pellet fly and hit the target, because it fires slow but has some hitting power.

The most important thing, in my opinion, is to get a decent scope and spend some time getting it set up just right. Being able to watch the pellet fly really helps you to become a sniper, you see the trajectory and get good at judging wind, distance etc., and keeping your eyes open and watching after you pull the trigger.

For bigger pests than hosps and starlings you will need more power.
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

4th Gen Martin Fan wrote:
Fri Jan 17, 2020 9:34 am
Beeman R9 breakbarrel spring-piston .20 rifle with Bushnell scope. No matter how hard I try to master the artillery hold, I am not pleased with my accuracy. Not blaming the rifle because someone proficient in the artillery hold could make me look like a new recruit.
jogl,
I do not consider my Beeman R9 as a cheap air rifle especially after I had a professional air rifle gunsmith check it & fine tune it. He professionally mounted a Bushnell scope on a scope mount that he personally recommended for this air rifle.
As I stated in my original post, I have not been able to master the artillery hold to attain adequate groupings at 25 yds. on any breakbarrel, spring-piston air rifle.

My confidence is high on PCP and Variable Pump Air Rifles. At 25 yds, I can consistently get quarter size groups. Any fliers are due to me, not the rifle.

What Beeman rifle do you use for HOSP & EUS?
Last edited by 4th Gen Martin Fan on Wed Jan 22, 2020 9:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
T-Bird
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2019 1:08 am
Location: McKinney Texas
Martin Colony History: Rookie Season
Trendsetter 12
PMCA Member

I’m really torn on which rifle to get. I’m leaning towards a PCP rifle, but dang its a lot of $$$ up front.

What air pumps are you guys using to keep your rifles full of air?
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