Story of a Martin Colony. written in 1902. Covers 1891-1902.

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Dave Duit
Posts: 1732
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

Here is a url http://essexpurplemartins.ca/wp-content ... Nature.pdf that takes you to a story titled "The Story of a Martin Colony", taken from the book "Gleanings from Nature". This is a definite reading for everyone who has had worries, concerns, failures, success' in being or becoming a purple martin landlord. It is interesting to see that what is written has relevance today, 123 years later. It is a feel good warm reading that is best read with a hot chocolate on a cold day. Once the story has downloaded, scroll down to page 48 to 84. The cover page will appear black on the right side and olive green on the left side. There are amazing pics of his homemade martin house included in the reading. Enjoy.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
DornCounty
Posts: 2172
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 3:58 pm
Location: Rural SE Kansas
Martin Colony History: .
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Trio-Jedi

can you relink this? It's not working for me.
2017 - Home & Public Colonies - 300 Cavities
Chuck4
Posts: 861
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 10:05 am
Location: North MS
Martin Colony History: I started trying to attract Purple Martins in 2011. I got my first breeding pair in 2013.

2013-1 pair, 2014-4 pair, 2015-8 pair, 2016-12 pair 60 babies :-).

I'd love to read the article, but the link doesn't work... :cry:
PMCA Member
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phldave
Posts: 513
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:44 pm
Location: Iowa/Pleasant Hill
Martin Colony History: Started trying in 2012 and still trying

Everybody try this link http://essexpurplemartins.ca/wp-content ... Nature.pdf
2012 late start
2013 nothing yet, lots a lookers
2014 Bust again
2015 Bust again
2016 Bust again
2017 Bust again
2018 April 14 a group joined me, but moved on after a week
2019 Had SY male seriously check me out but didn't stay
Steve Martin
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2014 9:38 am
Location: Tx/Bastrop

With a little searching and a little techno-magic I found the links.
Reference page
Gleanings-from-Nature.pdf
JJ Jones
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:08 am
Location: Shelbyville, Indiana
Martin Colony History: Average (100) pairs per season

Tried clicking on the link, however it took me nowhere.
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PMCA Member - East McKay Road Colony
Shelbyville, Indiana
JJ Jones
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:08 am
Location: Shelbyville, Indiana
Martin Colony History: Average (100) pairs per season

Steve,

Thanks for listing the link. Some great "history" of purple martins back in the day. They loved them as much as we do today.
____________

PMCA Member - East McKay Road Colony
Shelbyville, Indiana
Dave Duit
Posts: 1732
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
Dave Duit
Posts: 1732
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

I know it takes a little time, but once on the site you will need to scroll down to around page 48 to get to the story.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
John Miller
Posts: 4769
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 9:11 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

enjoyed the article very much -- I used Steve Martin's links, clicking the first and then the second and navigating to page 48, but also checked and Dave's last link works as well.

I suspect in the 1800s people put up "martin boxes" and just sort of took them for granted. Most photos we have are of people in the yard and we're lucky if the martin house is in the background.

Again thanks...


John Miller
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

Dave,
I read the entire article and have a better appreciation of my great grandfather's wooden martin houses that he built and the conditions which he dealt with.
When my father was a young teenager, he was visiting his grandfather and Grandpa Albert explained to him why he felt that his houses were more successful than martin houses built by others in the community. Grandpa Albert showed my father the specific size bit that he used in his hand auger to make the entrance holes for his martin houses.
Unfortunately, my father did not pay attention to the specific size of that bit. Both my father and I wish that we had that information now.
I am not inferring that I will use round holes because starlings are such a terrible menace in this area. I am only interested to know how the size of his round holes compare to round holes used more recently.
I would assume that European House Sparrows had reached central TX at the time his martin houses were up. I do not believe that European Starlings had reached that part of the US yet.

I noticed that J. Warren Jacobs' pictures show houses with square entrances. His text describes the square entrances as 2 1/2" square and his round holes as 2 3/4" diameter.
The text of his book does not mention starlings being a problem in his martin houses. His main concern seemed to be sparrows and a minor mention of bluebirds invading his martin houses.
I would recommend others read this book, The Story of a Martin Colony, so that they will know that the trials and tribulations of martin stewardship are timeless.
Mark.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
DornCounty
Posts: 2172
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 3:58 pm
Location: Rural SE Kansas
Martin Colony History: .
.
Trio-Jedi

that article reads just like today... HE had to kill 300 HOSP one season. didn't realize they were that bad back then.
2017 - Home & Public Colonies - 300 Cavities
JL Murray

They sure made some detailed Martin Houses back then!
John Miller
Posts: 4769
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 9:11 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

I was also surprised at house sparrows mentioned in the article being this numerous.

I also thought it odd a while bad when a bud came back from Hawaii and said house sparrows were there! They were introduced several places, including Hawaii.

http://birding.about.com/od/birdprofile ... istory.htm

While some studies find that most stay in a home range, some surely roam as they have colonized the continent.

We have a close cousin -- the Eurasian tree sparrow --in the St. Louis area and apparently about 75 miles out as I have seen them in Clarksville, Mo and parts of western Ill. Old bird guides say they are limited to St. Louis metro, but maybe they are slowly spreading too.

John M
4th Gen Martin Fan
Posts: 1483
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 1:19 pm
Location: TN/Collierville
Martin Colony History: I have been exposed to purple martin sounds in utero when my mother went out to get my father away from his martin colony.
I played around the martin colony every summer and watched as my father maintained his colony. In the late 50's until the 70's he did not notice European Starlings in south Texas.
When old enough, I helped maintain his colony. My primary task was eliminating English House Sparrows with a 1956 Benjamin 317 .177 air rifle.
When I settled into my own home, I started my first colony with an original Trio Castle and Trio Grandpa. When I moved again, I did not put up any martin houses. Frustration with European Starlings in the Southeast US was overwhelming.
Found PMCA Forum and learned about modern enlarged compartments and SREHs.
Inherited my father's last martin house, a Trio Grandma, modified it to modern specifications and have had good results since then.

John,
The Eurasian tree sparrow is the closest bird that I have ever seen that would resemble a European house sparrow. I can see several distinguishing features which would allow me to identify the difference.
I read this article which helped me to understand why they are in your area.

http://birding.about.com/od/birdprofile ... parrow.htm

The article says that they were introduced in Lafayette Park in St. Louis, MO in 1870.
Their limited range in North America seems to reinforce their nonaggressive nature and their limited spread across the country.
Enjoy them but please tell them to keep to their ancestral roots. No HOSP traits please.
Mark.
Mark.
Firm believer in HOSP/EUST Control, Enlarged Compartments, SREHs, Pole Predator Guards, Owl/Hawk Guards, Mite/Parasite Control, Housing Insulation, and Vents for Compartment Cooling.
PMCA Member.
John Miller
Posts: 4769
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 9:11 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO

Mark

They are a tiny bit smaller than house sparrows, and I only know this because I was experimenting with a slot entrance I had placed on gourd to protect wrens from house sparrows. The slot is 7/8 inch tall by 2 1/4 wide. It was used experimentally by some folks to restrict house sparrows, and perhaps be useful for tree swallows, but I have read that folks w ho tried it found house sparrows could enter. Not at my house, they tried and pushed..then I thought they "had" but I figured out that I had Eurasian tree sparrows nesting it the gourd. They make the same bulky sparrow nest and have multiple broods...I have no experience as to how aggressive they might be. I'll try and keep them here!

Dave, sorry to have gotten off track. One thing leads to another.
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