Jumper-Need help with feeding info

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Conrad Baker
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

We had a jumper yesterday, not sure which house he came out of. No mites, he just thought he was older than he is, and wasn't able to fly. Checked the three houses for like-size babies, put him in with them. This AM, he's back on the ground, so I tried another compartment with similar size babies. Well, they booted him too. He's back on the ground, and with this weather, he won't last long, so I got him wrapped in a towel to dry him, and brought him inside. Got some crickets from local bait store, and some Pedialyte (unflavored). He wouldn't eat them willingly, so I gently pried open his beak and put a Pedialyte cricket headfirst in his mouth, which he swallowed. After a few minutes I followed that one with two more, having to pry open his beak for both of them too. He swallowed them too. That was at 5:15 PM.
After all these years this is the first time I have had to feed and care for a jumper. He is probably 10 days to 2 weeks old, has full plumage and eyes are open. He "peeps" every couple of minutes a couple of times. I have him in a carboard box lined with bath towels, and a towel over the top to give him some security and keep him from getting chilled.

Now for the questions:
1-How often do I feed him?
2- How many crickets at a time?
3- When will I know when he is ready to go fly away?
4-Does Pedialyte need refrigeration after it is opened?

Thanks

Update: 6-19-21 "Jumper" did not make it through the nite. He was dead this AM when I went to feed him. At least he didn't die hiding under some bush soaking wet from the rain. His last hours were comfortable with a full tummy.
Last edited by Conrad Baker on Sun Jun 20, 2021 4:27 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Conrad Baker
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

P.S. Hoping he gets used to accepting the crickets, I hate prying his beak open but I just use my fingernail to gently pry it open.
Thomabear
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2020 10:10 am
Location: Cut Off, Louisiana

I found this article helpful and worth reading. Good Luck with the jumper!!

http://chuckspurplemartinpage.com/feeding.htm
2019- 6 Pair, 31 Hatched, 30 Fledged
2020- 8 Pair, 38 Hatched, 32 Fledged
2021- 10 Pair, 51 Hatched, 39 Fledged
2021- HOSP (Repeating Trap/Mararder Pellet Rifle) count to date 121, Starlings 2

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Conrad Baker
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

Thanks a lot Thomabear. That was perfect and just what I needed. Plenty of good info. Thanks again !!
Thomabear
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2020 10:10 am
Location: Cut Off, Louisiana

Glad to help and I hope that jumper survives. :)
2019- 6 Pair, 31 Hatched, 30 Fledged
2020- 8 Pair, 38 Hatched, 32 Fledged
2021- 10 Pair, 51 Hatched, 39 Fledged
2021- HOSP (Repeating Trap/Mararder Pellet Rifle) count to date 121, Starlings 2

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Dave Duit
Posts: 1956
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

Hi Conrad, I'm so sorry about my delay on responding. I sent you a personal reply to your email. If you don't receive it, please google in purple martin rehabilitation and click on the first entry titled, " Tending to sick, injured or orphaned purple martins". I hope I didn't get to you too late.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
Conrad Baker
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

Dave Duit wrote:
Sat Jun 19, 2021 5:32 pm
Hi Conrad, I'm so sorry about my delay on responding. I sent you a personal reply to your email. If you don't receive it, please google in purple martin rehabilitation and click on the first entry titled, " Tending to sick, injured or orphaned purple martins". I hope I didn't get to you too late.
Thanks Dave,
I responded to your email. Unfortunately the baby died. I discovered him dead this AM when I went to feed him,

Thanks for your well wishes,

Conrad
Dave Duit
Posts: 1956
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

Sorry to hear the bad news. If ever again this happens, at least you have the info now to tend to injured or sick martins.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
Conrad Baker
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

Yes Dave, for sure. I just did a nest check, and all of my houses are empty. No babies (dead or alive), and no pecked eggs, so I guess the season is winding down.
Conrad Baker
Posts: 452
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

Deleted- Duplicate post
philsand
Posts: 91
Joined: Mon May 18, 2015 9:54 am
Location: Eastern nc

Dave, are you aware of any data (banding for instance) supporting the idea that a young martin, that has been kept alive until it can be released, will survive without parents teaching it how to feed itself?
brent
Posts: 490
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:43 pm
Location: Raceland, Louisiana

I'd like to know if self feeding, like flying, is an instinct behavior. A bird raised with out parents can fly so why wouldn't they hunt and feed?
Brent
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